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Jackson accusors likely to get new day in court

Michael Jackson Graphic JPG

SANTA YNEZ, Calif.

People in the Santa Ynez Valley are used to stories about Michael Jackson and Neverland Ranch, off Figueroa Mountain Road, but many thought the trials were over.

That may not be the case.

This week 3 California appeals court judges tentatively ruled in favor of the two men in the Leaving Neverland documentary.

James Safechuck,41 and Wade Robson,37, were both in their 30s when their lawsuits were dismissed due to statutes of limitations expiration date.

A new California law allows people who suffered sexual abuse to file lawsuits until they are 40, rather than 26.

Since Safechuck filed the initial suit earlier it appears his case will get a second chance, like Robson's.

The defendants include MJJ Productions and MJJ Ventures, but not the Jackson Estate.

Gustavo Jimenez worked at Neverland during its heyday and doesn't think the men will stand a chance at getting money from a settlement.

Armando Fernandez remembers visiting Neverland and just wishes they would let the King of Pop rest in peace.

Another woman from the area, who wishes to remain anonymous, wants victims to have their day in court regardless of their age.

Jackson's accusers did not blame him during his high-profile criminal trial in Santa Barbara County back in 2005.

In the award-winning documentary, that came out a decade after Jackson's death, the men explained why it took so long for them to realize they had been abused at Neverland at different times and in hotels while on different tours. Their mothers also spoke out in the film.

Neverland, once listed for $100 million, is now on the market for $31 million.

Workers still tend to the property, but it is not the fan magnate it used to be.

Crime / Entertainment

Tracy Lehr

Tracy Lehr is a reporter and the weekend anchor of KCOY|KEYT|KKFX.