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COVID-19: Doctors share how to stay safe at pool parties during the pandemic

POOL PARTIES
PATRICIA MARTELLOTTI
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SANTA MARIA, Calif. - Dana Gonzalez and her friends are using a water hose to cool off on a warm afternoon in Santa Maria.

As temperatures rise, many are also going swimming.

"We’re at the end of summer and we are seeing families in social groups getting together and some of those events is having folks over for a pool party," said Dr. Scott Robertson with Marian Regional Medical Center.

Doctors say there is no evidence COVID-19 can be spread through swimming in the water.

But there are heath concerns.

"The concerns aren’t so much about when you’re in the water. It’s when you get out of the water. When you get together for eating or maybe you’re huddling together with your towels on without a mask. This is where the danger is," said Robertson.

With warmer weather approaching, doctors say pool parties are discouraged due to swimmers likely to be in close proximity.

"In my opinion it’s a bad idea because we really want to minimize contact especially with pool parties. You know it’s kind of hard to keep your distance in a pool party unless it’s just you and someone else and someone on one in the pool and the other person on the other end of the pool," said Dr. Melvin Lopez with Dignity Health.

These health concerns are not just for gatherings at a backyard pool.

It's also at public pools, lakes, even the ocean.

"So it's important for everybody to be very aware of their surroundings and continue to maintain the social distancing of at least 6 feet in between others," said Robertson.

While it’s not feasible to wear a mask when you’re swimming, doctors say you should wear one when you’re out of the water.

California / Community / Health / Lifestyle / Safety / Santa Maria - North County / Video

Patricia Martellotti

Patricia Martelotti is a reporter at KEYT|KCOY|KKFX.